January 24, 2010

Walton Children: (Parents Charles Eugene Walton and Jane McKechnie)

Children on the trek: Charles E. Walton Jr., Frances Magnolia, and Leona Jane Charles E. Walton Jr.

Charles E. Jr. When Charles came with his parent's through the Hole-in-the-Rock, he was about 12 years old. Because of his small size he was able to help in the building of the road down the Hole, by being let down over a cliff with a rope and placing the dynamite in especially placed holes.
He moved to Verdure from Bluff in 1887, and then into Monticello in 1888. He became a devoted Church worker, serving as Bishop for several years. He was the first postmaster in Monticello and served 30 years in that capacity. He married Louise Hyde. The couple had 5 children: Jean, Olive, Ila, Pearl, and William (Saga of San Juan.)

Francis Magnolia Walton continued to live in Monticello after her mother Jane’s death. On June 2nd, 1892 she married John Ezra Bailey. Magnolia (also called Maggie) became the mother to 7 children, one of which was Clifford Walton Bailey. (Mike King's grandfather). Maggie died after a long illness on September 7th, 1918. Her husband John, then married a mail order bride selected from an ad in the Montgomery Ward Catalog, named Lillie May Cox on November 6, 1919. Sadly, Lillie wasn’t well received by the Bailey children. No other information is available on Lillie at this time.




Leona Jane: Leona Jane Walton Nielson and her husband-to-be Francis Nielson, both came through the Hole-in-the-Rock in 1880. He was twelve, she, nine. Francis was the son of Jense and Kirsten Jensen Nielson. He was born in Cedar City, Utah in October 11, 1868. Leona was daughter of Charles E. Walton Sr and Jane McKethnie Walton. She was born in Bountiful, Utah, August 19, 1871. The couple was married in the Logan Temple November 30, 1892. They lived in Bluff, Verdure and Blanding.
At the age eight Leone left northern Utah with her family, traveling by ox team to join the historic company of colonizers who came to San Juan, via the famous Hole-in-the-Rock, arriving in April, 1880.

Experiencing the stern rigor of pioneer life, she grew to womanhood in Bluff. Here she lived with her parents in the Old Fort. Among her happy memories were those of attending Sunday School and recreational events under the giant cottonwood tree that became the center of all childhood social gatherings.
    She attended the early schools of Bluff, where because of lack of teachers and facilities, school was held mostly for benefits of discipline, while the garnering of knowledge came by chance and hard experience and not because of teacher possessed distinctive educational qualities for teaching.
In the Spring of 1888 Leona accompanied her father to the new settlement then known as North Montezuma, where she cooked and made a home for her father and a brother. This brought her the distinction of being the first woman to live in Monticello.
    Leona grew up in Monticello. After her marriage, she lived in Bluff, where she served as secretary to the Relief Society. When the family moved to Blanding in 1917, Leona worked in the MIA and the Primary Associations. She was known for her wonderful cooking ability and her meticulous housekeeping. Of their eight children in the family, three died: Lyle F., Howard G., and Elliot. The surviving children are Floyd W., Mrs. Henry L. (Genevieve) Ashton, Joseph L., Mrs. Val (Ila) Sundwall, and Mrs. Reed (Helen) Wilson.  Leona Walton Nielson died in Murry, September 9, 1942.
(Baby in photo is Floyd, father of Norman Nielson, Corrine Roring, Connie Nielson, and others

1 comment:

printcop said...

Francis Magnolia Walton continued to live in Monticello after her mother Jane’s death. On June 2nd, 1892 she married John Ezra Bailey. Magnolia (also called Maggie) became the mother to 7 children. Maggie died after a long illness on September 7th, 1918. Her husband John, then married a mail order bride selected from an ad in the Montgomery Ward Catalog, named Lillie May Cox on November 6, 1919. Sadly, Lillie wasn’t well received by the Bailey children. No other information is available on Lillie at this time. If you would like a picture of Magnolia, email Mike King at printcop@comcast.net